Tag Archives: United States

Concrete Round house, Logan, Ohio, United States

by Don O’Brien, a view of Round house, Logan, Ohio, United States

The Logan Roundhouse, also known as Stewart’s Folly – is likely the oddest structure in the small Ohio town of Logan. The design, lacking in flat surfaces or corner, has a very low wind resistance. Concrete walls further enhance the durability to withstand extreme weather such as tornadoes or hurricanes. This building was to be a prototype for others along coastlines and Tornado Alley.
The shell construction began in 1971 and was completed in 1973. The walls are 8 inches thick at the base, and 5 inches thick in the walls. Two floors, a basement with garage, and a porch were constructed. The house was never completed, nor was it ever wired for electricity .Today it stands empty.

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Rhyolite Ghost town, Nevada, United States

by Ken Lund, a view of Rhyolite Ghost town, Nevada, United States

Rhyolite is a ghost town in Nye County, in the U.S. state of Nevada. It is located in the Bullfrog Hills, about 120 miles (190 km) northwest of Las Vegas, near the eastern edge of Death Valley. The town began in early 1905 as one of several mining camps that sprang up after a prospecting discovery in the surrounding hills. During an ensuing gold rush, thousands of gold-seekers, developers, miners, and service providers flocked to the Bullfrog Mining District. Many settled in Rhyolite, which lay in a sheltered desert basin near the region’s biggest producer, the Montgomery Shoshone Mine.
Industrialist Charles M. Schwab bought the Montgomery Shoshone Mine in 1906 and invested heavily in infrastructure including piped water, electric lines, and railroad transportation that served the town as well as the mine. By 1907, Rhyolite had electric lights, water mains, telephones, newspapers, a hospital, a school, an opera house, and a stock exchange. Published estimates of the town’s peak population vary widely, but scholarly sources generally place it in a range between 3,500 and 5,000 in 1907–08.

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Ludlow cafe, Route 66, California, United States

by Bradley Fulton, a view of Ludlow cafe

The historic Ludlow Cafe is located in the Route 66 town of Ludlow. Once a prime eating place in town, the skeleton of this old building has been creaking apart slowly over the years.

Ludlow is a small town in the Mojave Desert on Interstate 40, located in San Bernardino County, California, United States. The older remains of the ghost town are along historic Route 66.

Route 66
By the 1940s, local mining and railway activity had ceased and the town survived supplying the needs of travellers on the National Old Trails Road, renamed to become the legendary Route 66 in California. Ludlow providing a Motor Court with bungalow cabins, the streamline moderne Ludlow Cafe, a gasoline-service garage, and shade. They operated through the late 1960s. After Interstate 40 was built bypassing town there was little business and most residents departed, leaving ruins of empty buildings and Tamarisk trees that still stand flanking the old highway. Tourists following and exploring historic Route 66 pass through the ghost town now.

Text from Wikipedia, Ludlow, California


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Bodie ghost town, California, United States

by Todd Lappin , a view of Bodie ghost town, California, United States

Bodie is a ghost town in the Bodie Hills east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in Mono County, California, United States, about 75 miles (120 km) southeast of Lake Tahoe. It is located 12 miles (19 km) east-southeast of Bridgeport, at an elevation of 8379 feet (2554 m). As Bodie Historic District, the U.S. Department of the Interior recognizes it as a National Historic Landmark. The ghost town has been administered by California State Parks since becoming a state historic park in 1962, and receives about 200,000 visitors yearly.

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