Tag Archives: italy

Botta Baths and Caimi Swimming Pool, Milan, Italy

by Barbara Sambri, a fish-eye view of the Caimi swimming pool

The Caimi swimming pool, located in Porta Romana quarter and bounded by Carlo Botta, Pier Lombardo, Giorgio Vasari e Lattuada streets, is a historical public bathing establishment, dismissed and totally abandoned since 2006.
Once pride of the area, relavant and outstanding place for Milan citizens since its construction in 1939, unfortunately, it is now a symbol of the Milan urban decay.
Botta Baths are not just a simple swimming pool: besides the antique amphitheater bathtub, the complex accommodates changing rooms, a rooftop solarium, two arbors, one gym and a cinema, everything (all of these) located inside a wooden park, bounded by a masonry fence, and connected with staircases to the swimming pool.
The complex was built in late 30′s, to provide a public structure where people, thanks to a reduction in working hours, could enjoy the new spare time, following the motto “mens sana in corpore sano”.
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Canate di Marsiglia, Liguria, Italy


by Paolo De Lorenzi, a view of Canate di Marsiglia, Liguria

The medieval village of Canate is located north east of Genoa, at an altitude of 550 meters over the sea level approximately, on the southern side of mount Lago. The village can only be reached by foot and this is the reason of its total abandonment happened between 1957 and 1958, when the last 27 families left definitively the village. At the end of the Second World War the inhabitants were about 150 and approximately thirty families. In 1951 the residents were less than 100.
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Ex sanatorium, Montecatone, Imola, Italy

by Cristina Vecchi & Alessandra Bonetti, a view of Ex sanatorium, Montecatone, Imola

Montecatone hospital is about 5 Km from Imola, on the hills, at an altitude of approx. 300 metres, in the midst of a park of 30.000 sq.m.
From 1929 until the beginning of the Second World War, three wards in rationalist style were built in order to cure patients of tuberculosis, a serious and widespread issue at that time.
This building works gave also many poor labourers the possibility of having a good job.
The whole construction is approx. 2,5 km long. The central part is still working nowadays as one of the most advanced centre for the cure and rehabilitation of patients with medullary trauma. The north and south buildings, instead, were abandoned at the beginning of the ’80.
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Craco village, Matera, Italy

by Jean Pierre Pommerol, a view of Craco village, Matera, Italy

Craco is a commune and medieval village located in the Region of Basilicata and the Province of Matera in Italy. About 25 miles inland from the Gulf of Taranto at the instep of the “boot” of Italy. The medieval village of Craco is typical of the hill towns of the region with mildly undulating shapes and the lands surrounding it sown with wheat.
Craco was built on a very steep summit, for defensive reasons, giving it a stark and striking appearance and distinguishing it from the surrounding lands which are characterized by soft shapes. The centre, built on the highest side of the town, facing a ridge runs steeply to the southwest where newer buildings exist. The town sits atop a 400 metre high cliff that overlooks the Cavone River valley. Throughout the area are many unique vegetation-less mounds formed by intensive erosion that are called “calanchi.”

by Jean Pierre Pommerol, a view of Craco village, Matera, Italy

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Village Valle Piola, Torricella Sicura, Teramo, Italy

by pizzodisevo, a view of Village Valle Piola, Torricella Sicura, Teramo, Italy

Valle Piola is a deserted village in the province of Teramo, in the Abruzzo region of central Italy. It is part of the municipality of Torricella Sicura. Having been abandoned in 1977, all that remains are 9 abandoned houses, a church, and the ruins of a shepherds’ shelter. The village has recently received renewed interest from the Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga National Park authorities with the aim of restoring and revitalizing the village and its environs.

by pizzodisevo, a view of Village Valle Piola, Torricella Sicura, Teramo, Italy

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House of Artists, Garibaldi 89/A, Brera, Milan, Italy

by Grazia Ippolito, a frontal view of the House of Artists

The history of this building, known as “Casa degli Artisti”, literally House of Artists, is one of the best we’ve ever talked about, it’s a story of art and passion that deeply touches the heart of sensible people, so I believe you’ll love it!
Everything starts in the beginning of the last century, when the Bogani’s brothers decided to build an house for artists, a place where painters, sculptors, photographers and others could work in a comfortable environment and share ideas with each other, an attraction pole for intellectuals and artists, the source of a cultural debate for the whole city.

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Castiglioncello, Firenzuola, Italy

by Laura Mancini, a view of Castiglioncello Village, Firenzuola, Italy

Castiglioncello is a small fortified village, that sits on the top of a crest in the Appennino Tosco-Romagnolo, strategically located on the ancient line that used to connect Florence and Imola.
This small village, located on the left side of the river Santerno, very close to Moraduccio, has the typical characteristics of an old castle, with the natural defenses of the river surrounding it almost entirely.

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Poggioreale, Trapani, Italy

by Barbara Sambri , a view of Poggioreale Square, Trapani, Italy

Poggioreale is one of the most shocking places you’ll probably ever see in your life! It is a ghost town that sits in the center of western Sicily: it used to be a nice place since during the night between the 14th and 15th of January 1968 an earthquake completely devastated the area know as Valle del Belice (Belice Valley). Some small villages were severely devastated, among them Gibellina (we talked about it a few days ago), Salaparuta, Montevago and Poggioreale were so damaged that have been rebuilt from scratch in another place.

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Psychiatric hospital “Osservanza”, Imola, Italy

 

by Davide Angeli, a view of Psychiatric hospital “Osservanza”, Imola, Italy

The Observance asylum was built in 1890, because of the growing need for beds, that the existing Central asylum was not able to handle. At the time Luigi Lolli (Riolo Terme Imola 1819-1896), founder and director of the existing asylum, decided to build a decentralized structure that consisted of independent pavilions, had a capacity of about 1000 patients and that covered, with the agricultural colony, an area of approximately 75,000 square meters. The design model was taken from the Academy of Sciences in Paris, dating back to 1788, but still considered the most appropriate and perfect example.

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Ex Slaughterhouse, Imola, Italy

by Daniela Galvani, a view of Ex Macello, Imola, Italy

It’s the first property that will be sold by the municipality, but is also the one with the richest history. The ex-slaughterhouse was derived in part from the walls of an old eighteenth-century theater, designed by the architect Cosimo Morelli. The building was constructed thanks to 16 citizens, part of the Imola’s noble families (hence the original name, Theater of Associated Knights) who in 1774 took over the financial burden of the construction works.
The theater was inaugurated on the 27th July 1782 and soon became famous for the bold architectural solutions studied by Morelli and the decorations of Antonio and Alessandro Della Nave Villa, who painted the ceiling and floor. Unfortunately, it had short life: on the 5th February 1797 it was destroyed, perhaps for a fire set by a theater company unsatisfied for engagement.
Later the building was partially rebuilt and it was used as a stable, until the acquisition by the City of Imola, that in 1864 converted it into the slaughterhouse. The building has remained in operation until 1978.

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