Monthly Archives: March 2011

Kings Park Psychiatric Center, New York, US

by Doug Kerr, a view of Kings Park Psychiatric Center, Long Island, New York, USA

The Kings Park Psychiatric Center, known by Kings Park locals simply as ‘The Psych Center’, is a former state-run psychiatric hospital located in Kings Park, New York. It operated from 1885 until 1996, when the State of New York closed the facility down, either releasing its few remaining patients or transferring them to the still-operational Pilgrim Psychiatric Center.

Continue reading

AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Carabanchel Prison, Madrid, Spain

by Laura, a view of Carabanchel Prison, Madrid, Spain

Carabanchel Prison was constructed by political prisoners after the Spanish Civil War between 1940 and 1944 in the Madrid’s neighbourhood of Carabanchel. It was one of the biggest prisons in Europe until its closure in 1998. The structure followed the panopticon model devised by Jeremy Bentham in 1785.
During General Francisco Franco’s regime (1936–1975) the prison hosted a large community of political prisoners, which included relevant members of democratic and leftist political parties and union leaders. Notable inmates included Marcelino Camacho (leader of the Communist clandestine union Comisiones Obreras) and the rest of top-rank members of it imprisoned as a result of the Process 1001, Julián Ariza (member also of the same union), Nicolás Redondo (leader of Workers’ General Union), Eduardo Saborido, Simón Sánchez Montero (Communist leader, who server 25 years in prison), José María Ruiz Gallardón (monarchist opponent to the dictatorship and father of the current Mayor of Madrid Alberto Ruiz Gallardón), Nicolás Sartorius, Ramón Tamames, Enrique Múgica and Enrique Curiel (Communist activists), Miguel Boyer (Socialist activist and a minister later), Fernando Sánchez-Dragó, Miguel Gila, Fernando Savater, Fernando Arrabal, CNT member Luís Andrés Edo and would-be Franco assassins Stuart Christie and Fernando Carballo Blanco. After Franco’s death, only common criminals and terrorists belonging to the Basque terrorist group ETA and other paramilitary groups remained.

Continue reading

AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Wiluna Gold Mine, Wiluna State, Australia

by Philip Schubert, a view of Wiluna Gold Mine, Wiluna State, Australia

The Wiluna Gold Mine is an active gold mine in Western Australia near the town of Wiluna. The mine was active from 1984 till its closure in 2007, when it was put into care and maintenance, and again since late 2008.
After commissioning from its recent upgrade the mine should have resumed full operations before the end of 2008; however, delays in the comissoning had forced the owner, APEX Minerals, to raise more money and postpone this date. The company announced on 5 March 2009 that full production had resumed.
The mine is located on the native title of the Ngaanyatjarra aboriginal people.

On 27 January, APEX announced a trading halt for the purpose of yet another capital raising, an asset sale and a restructuring.

Text from Wikipedia, Wiluna Gold Mine


AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Concrete Round house, Logan, Ohio, United States

by Don O’Brien, a view of Round house, Logan, Ohio, United States

The Logan Roundhouse, also known as Stewart’s Folly – is likely the oddest structure in the small Ohio town of Logan. The design, lacking in flat surfaces or corner, has a very low wind resistance. Concrete walls further enhance the durability to withstand extreme weather such as tornadoes or hurricanes. This building was to be a prototype for others along coastlines and Tornado Alley.
The shell construction began in 1971 and was completed in 1973. The walls are 8 inches thick at the base, and 5 inches thick in the walls. Two floors, a basement with garage, and a porch were constructed. The house was never completed, nor was it ever wired for electricity .Today it stands empty.

[Text]

more resources:
[Video]
[forgottenoh]


AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Kayakoy Ghost Town, Turkey

by Chris Parfitt, a view of Kayakoy Ghost Town, Turkey

Kayaköy, or Levissi as it was known to its former inhabitants, was a Greek town until 1923, when, after the multinational Ottoman Empire drew to close, governments of Greece and Turkey concluded on a population exchange to become nation states ethnically homogenous as much as possible on the basis of Treaty of Lausanne.

Continue reading

AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Highgate tube station, London, UK

by Hywel Williams, a view of Highgate tube station, Highgate, London, UK

Highgate tube station is a London Underground station on Archway Road, Highgate, not far from Highgate Village in north London. It is on the High Barnet branch of the Northern Line, between Archway and East Finchley, in Travelcard Zone 3.
The present low-level station was built in the late 1930s as part of London Underground’s Northern Heights plan. It is just part of the planned station but the advent of the Second World War postponed parts of the project and eventually led to its cancellation. The low-level station was built directly below the existing high-level London & North Eastern Railway (LNER) station.

Text from Wikipedia, Highgate tube station


AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Copper mine of Kennecott, Alaska, USA

by Jeremy Blakeslee, a view of Copper mine of Kennecott, Alaska, USA

Kennecott, also known as Kennecott Mines or AHRS Site No. XMC-001, is an abandoned mining camp in the Valdez-Cordova Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska that was the center of activity for several copper mines. It is located beside the Kennicott Glacier, northeast of Valdez, inside Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The camp and mines are now a National Historic Landmark District administered by the National Park Service.
It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1986.

Continue reading

AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Hellingly Psychiatric Hospital, East Sussex, England

by Paul, a view of Hellingly Psychiatric Hospital, East Sussex, England

Hellingly Hospital was a large mental hospital in the village of Hellingly, east of Hailsham, in East Sussex, England. The hospital, also known as East Sussex County Asylum or just Hellingly, was opened in 1903. Its architect was GT Hine, one of the great asylum architects of the era.
The hospital boasted its own railway line, the Hellingly Hospital Railway, used principally for transport of coal. This branch line led from the main line to the boilerhouse.

Continue reading

AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
Loading ... Loading ...

Rhyolite Ghost town, Nevada, United States

by Ken Lund, a view of Rhyolite Ghost town, Nevada, United States

Rhyolite is a ghost town in Nye County, in the U.S. state of Nevada. It is located in the Bullfrog Hills, about 120 miles (190 km) northwest of Las Vegas, near the eastern edge of Death Valley. The town began in early 1905 as one of several mining camps that sprang up after a prospecting discovery in the surrounding hills. During an ensuing gold rush, thousands of gold-seekers, developers, miners, and service providers flocked to the Bullfrog Mining District. Many settled in Rhyolite, which lay in a sheltered desert basin near the region’s biggest producer, the Montgomery Shoshone Mine.
Industrialist Charles M. Schwab bought the Montgomery Shoshone Mine in 1906 and invested heavily in infrastructure including piped water, electric lines, and railroad transportation that served the town as well as the mine. By 1907, Rhyolite had electric lights, water mains, telephones, newspapers, a hospital, a school, an opera house, and a stock exchange. Published estimates of the town’s peak population vary widely, but scholarly sources generally place it in a range between 3,500 and 5,000 in 1907–08.

Continue reading

AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...

Ludlow cafe, Route 66, California, United States

by Bradley Fulton, a view of Ludlow cafe

The historic Ludlow Cafe is located in the Route 66 town of Ludlow. Once a prime eating place in town, the skeleton of this old building has been creaking apart slowly over the years.

Ludlow is a small town in the Mojave Desert on Interstate 40, located in San Bernardino County, California, United States. The older remains of the ghost town are along historic Route 66.

Route 66
By the 1940s, local mining and railway activity had ceased and the town survived supplying the needs of travellers on the National Old Trails Road, renamed to become the legendary Route 66 in California. Ludlow providing a Motor Court with bungalow cabins, the streamline moderne Ludlow Cafe, a gasoline-service garage, and shade. They operated through the late 1960s. After Interstate 40 was built bypassing town there was little business and most residents departed, leaving ruins of empty buildings and Tamarisk trees that still stand flanking the old highway. Tourists following and exploring historic Route 66 pass through the ghost town now.

Text from Wikipedia, Ludlow, California


AwfulNot badNiceVery niceAmazing (No Ratings Yet)
Loading ... Loading ...